Tag Archives: jenna weis

Life and Beauty – Spoken Words of Steven T. Licardi

stevenbooks2By Jenna Weis

Finding beauty and self-acceptance in our ever-changing modern society can be found with the help of many creative outlets if one allows it. When faced with a struggle early in life, poet, author, and visual artist Steven T. Licardi found his calling in the written word. The West Islip native exudes positivity and brings forth social issues in his poetry to connect with and inspire his audience. Taking the stage from South Hampton to the Upper East Side, Licardi’s greatest personal achievements as a poet are opening for award-winning poet Buddy Wakefield at the Velvet Lounge in East Setauket, and performing throughout California.

Before all of the numerous honorable mentions, awards, and truly making a name for himself in the world of poetry, his journey began with writing as an apparatus for Licardi to express and understand his emotional states. As a child he was diagnosed with Pervasive Development Disorder, which made it difficult to connect with his emotions. Creativity allows Licardi to fully connect his mind and spirit.stevenspeaking1

“I think writing and specifically poetry provided the best way for me to make sense of my emotions. My manifestation of a PDD was a developmental disconnect between my cognitions and my emotions, and the ability to express myself helped to bridge that gap.”

The road of self-remedy has also paved the path of self-discovery for Licardi who has built his confidence and stamina to use his talents to be heard, understood, and cause emotional reaction. This seems to be a driving force for Licardi, as it would for anyone who is immersed in the creative world. To do something of passion that attracts attention as Licardi has accomplished is a true success. Not only his words but his delivery resonates a powerful punch of hope, even when addressing serious issues.

“My writing and my art are inspired by a desire to get people thinking, to explore a facet of culture, of society, of life, or of humanity. That is why a lot of my work deals with social issues (mental health, death, pop culture, etc.) I want people to understand, to think, to feel. To experience something new”10700317_831358190231647_2061123366574394804_o

Once an obstacle, now Licardi praises the mere experience of feeling an emotion, any emotion. What can bring more of an emotional force than the thought of death? Specifically, your own death. The ultimate inevitable end-game we all face has fascinated Licardi for quite some time. He is in the final stages of finishing a novel he began 10 years ago which explores death from the point of view of the main character “Anaximander”. Working on this project has guided Licardi to an unexpected new outlook on life.

MVI_7096.MOV.Still001“If you embrace death, invite it into your home, sit and have a cup of tea with it, take it by the hand and say, “Come with me. Guide me” (because a good guide always knows what your final destination will be), it will show you how precious everything is. A glass of water becomes a delicacy. The fact that nothing will last makes everything beautiful and perfect.”

Licardi’s poetry strengthens our perceptions and challenges us to believe in something, stand up for it, experience new things, and embrace life and all its beauty. He will be performing at SPARKBOOM’S JINGLE BOOM: HOLIDAY BASH event on Saturday, December 20th at Huntington Arts Council’s Main Street Gallery located at 213 Main Street from 6-10PM along with James Kim, Frankie A. Soto, Meredith Nussbaum, and Bri Onishea. There will be craft beer courtesy of Saint James Brewery, treats from Stella Blue Bistro, Hint water, prize giveaways courtesy of Sip Tea Lounge, Lotus Vintage, Kilwins Huntington, and Escape Pod Comics, live music and windows tinsled out by Reme and Caitlyn Shea.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

rain roomJenna Weis grew up on Long Island and graduated from Commack High School in 2007. She received her Associates Degree in Visual Arts from Suffolk Community College then went on to receive her Bachelor’s Degree in Art History and Criticism from Stony Brook University. This is her second summer working for SPARKBOOMTM, first as Lead Blogger. She hopes the blog will really engage readers to want to see more of the artists work at our SPARKBOOMTM events and help further promote the artists themselves.

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See and Be Seen: Street Art of Reme 821

By Jenna Weis

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In the more recent years, street art has become a widely appreciated style thanks to the artists who create it. What was once mostly seen as an act of vandalism, street art has been transformed into exceptionally crafted visual artwork that is easily accessible to anyone of any background. Artists like Reme Rowland (aka Reme 821) uses this tactic of displaying their work as a way to expose their art to the public, making the connection between artist and viewer a more stream lined transaction.

IMG_8934Rowland is a fellow Long Islander from Suffolk County who has been leaving his creative mark throughout the island at music studios, art studios, tattoo shops, and various other businesses as well as around the Bronx and Brooklyn area. A self-taught artist creating dynamically bold designs since the 80s, Rowland possesses immense confidence in his work and wanted to share what he can offer as a visual artist to the people.

“After many years of writing my name over & over I got bored with that” he says “and thought it was just getting selfish like it was just for me. So after painting in Brooklyn a few times & seeing people’s reactions to my art I wanted to paint for the streets, the people, the daily commuters that walk past art daily. They really appreciate it. It’s a great feeling to see them react to your art on a big scale”

Immensely energetic yet approachable artwork constructed with explosive shapes and loud colors, is described as “Geometric Funk” by Rowland who spent years developing his signature style. His fun and fresh abstract approach adds a new dimension to the already multi-faceted world of street art. An element of his work that can easily be traced back to Rowland is the frequent appearance of an animated hooded eye design. Its significance speaks to how Rowland sees art as something alive that also looks back to the viewer.IMG_0762

“The EYE design is basically a representation of how you are able to see Art & the world, through the Eye. So it’s called EYEF** … It’s the Art itself staring back at you.”

A formal introduction to the EYE and the Geometric Funk style of Reme Rowland will be taken place at SPARKBOOM’s “JINGLE BOOM: HOLIDAY BASH” on Saturday, December 20th at Huntington Arts Council’s Main Street Gallery located at 213 Main Street from 6-10PM. Rowland will be showcasing his work on a window display customized for the event to “introduce the Eye to new ‘Eyes’”. Enjoy amazing artwork, craft beer courtesy of Saint James Brewery, sweet treats from Stella Blue Bistro, Hint water, prize giveaways courtesy of Sip Tea Lounge, Lotus Vintage, Kilwins Huntington, and Escape Pod Comics, and live music and poetry.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

rain roomJenna Weis grew up on Long Island and graduated from Commack High School in 2007. She received her Associates Degree in Visual Arts from Suffolk Community College then went on to receive her Bachelor’s Degree in Art History and Criticism from Stony Brook University. This is her second summer working for SPARKBOOMTM, first as Lead Blogger. She hopes the blog will really engage readers to want to see more of the artists work at our SPARKBOOMTM events and help further promote the artists themselves.

 

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Puneeta Mittal – From the Microscope to the Canvas

"Dendrites I"

“Dendrites I”

By Jenna Weis

Abstracted art has for centuries allowed artists to break boundaries of the norm and encounter new discoveries in the art-making process as well as provide a more discrete means of spreading ideas. At first glance it seems the only concern is with color, form, and texture, but upon more careful observation and research, sometimes an abstracted work goes beyond its formal qualities. You just have to peel back the layers. Duality, depth, and beauty are just the cusp of what can be experienced when confronted with a piece by artist Puneeta Mittal, who has managed to effortlessly incorporate a fascination of science into her powerfully appealing works of art.

What we see in her art today can be traced back to the spring of 2004 when Mittal came across a high-resolution image of a mouse brain. A scientist would take this image at face value and focus on the subjective –the facts, but Mittal saw a landscape. An organic arrangement of artistic elements that inspired this artist to, “visualize beauty in the repulsive, find knowledge in the unknown, and to observe the unseen to more clearly see our world.”

"Internal Space IV"

“Internal Space IV”

Mittal is highly influenced by the technique of glaze painting for its textural multi-layered quality, and was a suitable approach to produce works of substance and depth, the same substance and depth she sees in a single microscopic view; how she sees the world.

internal Space III

“Internal Space III”

“While I utilize scientific content as the basic substrate of my works”, she says “as an artist I exercise my freedom to break the confines pertaining to accuracy of data and reality.”

Her signature touch is how the structure and the subjective are undercut by the spontaneity in composition of Mittal’s oil paintings. She fuses the rigidness of modern science with the freedom of expression in her use of both passionate and subtle colors rhythmically composed as a nod to the natural world that also greatly inspires Mittal. This constant juxtaposition of real and metaphorical, science and spiritual, abstract and literal add a sense of complexity and intrigue for the viewer that is also seen in her ceramic pieces. Simplistic shapes of painted multi-layered surfaces which she refers to as “landscape and terrain” acknowledges a quote by Robert Morris; “The simplicity of shape does not necessarily mean simplicity of idea.”

Mittal’s work is on display from October 1st to November 1st at the Islip Art Museum. SPARKBOOMTM will be co-curated the show along with Beth Giacummo, including the closing reception on November 1st, “Things Are Getting Hairy”, featuring a Hair Sculpture Show, food, music, Mythological Costume Contest, and of course, all of the amazing artists on display.  Visit islipartmuseum.org for more info!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

rain roomJenna Weis grew up on Long Island and graduated from Commack High School in 2007. She received her Associates Degree in Visual Arts from Suffolk Community College then went on to receive her Bachelor’s Degree in Art History and Criticism from Stony Brook University. This is her second summer working for SPARKBOOMTM, first as Lead Blogger. She hopes the blog will really engage readers to want to see more of the artists work at our SPARKBOOMTM events and help further promote the artists themselves.

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The Quizzical World of Alexa Dexa

alexadexaphotoBy Jenna Weis

Childhood toys, whimsical sounds and visuals, and effortless singing are brought together by Alexa Dexa, who incorporates these unconventional components together to bring a whole new experience for her audiences. As an artist in every sense of the word, Alexa has concocted her very own genre of performance called “toychestral electronic pop” that involves the sounds of desk bells, a toy piano, and self-made electronic beats complimenting her self-written songs. This quirky performer engages all the senses in her performances and brings the concept of fantasy to life.

There is nothing typical about what is created by Alexa. Her instruments of choice spark a nostalgic note that brings us back to the simpler times of childhood, yet the mature content of her songs and soulful voice gives us something special not seen before. She says “My song-writing boasts some mature juxtapositions of words and concepts because I like to work in abstractions that have multi-dimensional meanings.” Recently her songs have a direct connection with the new sights and experiences she has encountered while being on tour, widening the variety of her song concepts. She says that “having a catalyst outside of myself helps me touch on subjects inside myself that might not have otherwise been realized.”
Of course, the most unexpected treats are the toys and child-like art installations done by Alexa herself, enhancing what she calls “sound worlds”. These worlds are inspired by the artist’s personality and aesthetics that appeal to her. She says the intent of combining her songs with her visual work is “to transport the audience into a bit of fantasy and to allow access to my music through a different avenue of perception.” The primary colors of the toys, graphic illustrative backdrops, and mellow tunes haul you into a serene and friendly environment all assembled from the mind of Alexa.

Her inventive creativity is what makes Alexa stand out in the areas of music, performance, and visual art as she blends these boundaries so seamlessly. Alexa will be performing her one-of-a-kind show Monday August 18th at 7PM, after the screening of “Frank” at the Cinema Arts Centre presented by SPARKBOOM™. RSVP on Facebook here.

For more on Alexa Dexa visit http://www.alexadexa.com/

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

rain roomJenna Weis grew up on Long Island and graduated from Commack High School in 2007. She received her Associates Degree in Visual Arts from Suffolk Community College then went on to receive her Bachelor’s Degree in Art History and Criticism from Stony Brook University. This is her second summer working for SPARKBOOMTM, first as Lead Blogger. She hopes the blog will really engage readers to want to see more of the artists work at our SPARKBOOMTM events and help further promote the artists themselves.

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Yukito Yoneyama – Emphasis on the Now

time_code_table

“Time Code Table”

By Jenna Weis

Being immersed into the highly diversity of cultures and sights around the US presented artist Yukito Yoneyama the exposure to contemplate a given moment. As a native of Yokohama, Japan, traveling the US has given Yoneyama the resilience to be open to his new surroundings. Living in the moment is what encompasses the mind of this artist. When asked about his fascination with the present moment, he explained “I had spent [a] significant amount of time focusing all my energy and time into ‘living’ for the future. At one point in my life, I found myself realizing that tomorrow never comes. When tomorrow comes, it becomes ‘today’.” With the future an illusion, all we have is the moment we are in to savor.

Yoneyama approaches his art from a spiritual perspective, which visually is highly abstracted with ethereal use of color in his oil paintings or mesmerizing textures in his charcoal and pen and ink pieces. The concept of time and pre-destined plans are irrelevant for Yoneyama who says “What I try to focus on is to stay spontaneous throughout the entire creative process, from the moment when the light bulb goes on while brushing my teeth, listening to my son snore, to the moment the piece leaves my studio.” Thoughts are abandoned and judgments are made in the midst of the creation.

five_elements_fire1

“Five Elements of Fire”

Without the substance of a recognizable image in his work, there is a heavy dependence on the metaphysical. There is no connection to the physical world, just with the mind. Yoneyama explains “you are dealing with something different, such as intuitions, abstract thoughts, and metaphysical questions.” This idea is reflected in the lightness in his work. Free of being judged or compared and just being what it is. In his compressed charcoal piece entitled Time Code Table, we are presented with an image unfolded during the art making process, based off an idea in the moment that abandons time and space. It is as though as a viewer you are forced to savor what is before you and focus on what is here.

Come experience the metaphysical art of Yukito Yoneyama at SPARKBOOMTM‘s Artspace Unplugged event at 20 Terry Street, Patchogue August 9th from 6-10PM. For details, visit our official Facebook event for the show.

To see more of the artists’ work, visit: studioraiyu.com.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

rain roomJenna Weis grew up on Long Island and graduated from Commack High School in 2007. She received her Associates Degree in Visual Arts from Suffolk Community College then went on to receive her Bachelor’s Degree in Art History and Criticism from Stony Brook University. This is her second summer working for SPARKBOOMTM, first as Lead Blogger. She hopes the blog will really engage readers to want to see more of the artists work at our SPARKBOOMTM events and help further promote the artists themselves.

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Kasmira Mohanty – The Creative Side of Modern Technology

Oksana

“Oksana”

By Jenna Weis

Portraiture has been a significant foundation to the art world. For centuries artists have been commissioned to paint for some of the most influential people in the world as well as the everyday folk. To master the craft is one thing, but to bring the subject such life and vibrancy is the true artistry as graphic designer Kasmira Monhanty does in her portraits. Mixing tradition with the modern techniques of Photoshop and Illustrator, Mohanty compares her preferred medium with the Impressionist era stating “The invention of the paint tube changed the art world forever and most did not get what Impressionists were creating until later on.  I think the same is happening now.  I’m grateful to be part of that experience”

"Poppie"

“Poppie”

Mohanty’s artistic journey began quite modestly compared to what you see here. As a photographer for somewhat typical gigs, an experience teaching photography to students in need of inspiration set the bar for her work. She saw such a positive and energetic reaction from her students to their own portraits which forced her to discover the sense of value a self image can ignite for someone. “A portrait was no longer an image on a flat piece of paper, but a living breathing entity.  Till this day I cherish those images” she says.

Lulu

“Lulu”

Mohanty decided to abandon the palette and brush for a computer, digitally creating her work with Photoshop which took her years to master. A common thread in these portraits is the original patterns she uses quite generously. Inspired by ancient Rangoli designs, Mohanty designs and redesigns these images off the cuff, sometimes with symbolic undertones. Using her piece entitled Tara and Ellyn as an example, she explains “I used the Gemini symbol to create a pattern and in the space that was left in between I put two circles representing the phrase ‘two peas in a pod’.”

Bold confident colors with complex and simple patterns engage the viewer. There is so much to take in visually, but what is truly amazing is despite the combination of colors and patterns that tend to make an image flat, here the subject is so alive and soulful. You get a sense of a true living and breathing person before you. These portraits are a definite must see at SPARKBOOM’s Artspace Unplugged event August 9th from 6-10PM at 20 Terry Street in Patchogue. RSVP here.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

rain roomJenna Weis grew up on Long Island and graduated from Commack High School in 2007. She received her Associates Degree in Visual Arts from Suffolk Community College then went on to receive her Bachelor’s Degree in Art History and Criticism from Stony Brook University. This is her second summer working for SPARKBOOMTM, first as Lead Blogger. She hopes the blog will really engage readers to want to see more of the artists work at our SPARKBOOMTM events and help further promote the artists themselves.

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Jeffrey Allen Price – Reconfiguring What is Mundane

By Jenna Weisbrickolages_wall_full_corner_test6_20_14sm

With his inventive methods in recomposing materials and symbolic gestures, the work of Jeffrey Allen Price is something to take a deeper look at. Broken down into several series of works all named by literal puns from the artist it is the reaction from nature that grounds these pieces. As a jack of all trades in the art world from paintings to performance art to installations, Price chose to encounter his art his own way using materials from his own life and his studio to assist. As a result aesthetically beautiful and intriguing works of art is created with unconventional, nature relying processes, alluding to the passage of time, death, and decay.

This artist has truly been dedicated to his work for the past 20 years not only collecting materials but also tending to his ABSORPTION MODULES. ABMODS, for short, is paper that has been stained with natural substances, weighed dimageown outdoors for a significant amount of time to be affected by nature. Prepared stacks of paper un-perfected by nature combined with the precise amount of care by Price, as if tending to a garden. He explains “After a period of weeks or months, I determine by aesthetic “feel” which GardenStacks are “ripe” and ready to be “harvested.”  They are then collected, dried and prepared to be “consumed,” or made ready for exhibition.” The natural process of the decaying paper corresponds to the same process of death. Price states “Their slowly disintegrating surfaces mimic the process of death. Absorption Modules absorb time.”

Jeffrey Allen Price will be exhibiting his work at SPARKBOOM’s ArtSpace Unplugged event Saturday, August 9th from 6-10 PM at 20 Terry Street in Patchogue, NY. Come experience his ritualistic configuration of the mundane. RSVP via Facebook here.

Explore Jeffrey’s website here: www.jeffreyallenprice.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

rain roomJenna Weis grew up on Long Island and graduated from Commack High School in 2007. She received her Associates Degree in Visual Arts from Suffolk Community College then went on to receive her Bachelor’s Degree in Art History and Criticism from Stony Brook University. This is her second summer working for SPARKBOOMTM, first as Lead Blogger. She hopes the blog will really engage readers to want to see more of the artists work at our SPARKBOOMTM events and help further promote the artists themselves.

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The Inner Workings of Oliver Peterson

Big_Top_by_oliver_peterson

“Big Top”

By Jenna Weis

Inspiration can come from almost anywhere in any form and according to artist Oliver Peterson the world offers such an abundance of creative influences that drive his artistic endeavors. From history, literature, and films to the paranormal and comic books, just about anything worth experiencing is of interest to the artist. Using found materials that intrigue his senses, Peterson constructs eye-catching collages of expressive and energetic responses to the subject matter at hand. With a BFA from the School of Visual arts and an MFA in writing from Long Island University, his artistic eye and experience as a journalist shine through his pieces that not only are visually compelling but also communicate with the viewer.

Elegy_by_oliver_peterson

“Elegy”

The physical act of art making is a main factor in how these pieces are produced. Each element relating to the next then arranged based on the particular subject matter and Peterson’s creative conscience. Peterson explains “Visually, it just happens through small decisions and what’s available to me at the time. Content-wise, it can be random, but more and more I find themes and follow them through as I go. I rarely set out to do anything. I prefer to let the process be my guide.” Combining paint, patinas, paper and relevant materials his 2D pieces work so naturally all together and individually. It is as if these materials, colors, and ideas were meant to coincide within one work of art.

"Apes On Planet"

“Apes On Planet”

Peterson’s more recent journey has delved into his love of comic books and action figures. With an immense toy collection of his own, he removed them from their boxes and took photos as a more laid back and light hearted way let out his creativity. He says “Photographing them is a way to interact and have fun with my toys in a way that’s at least a tiny bit more adult than sitting on the floor and playing with them!… The toys photos provided a way for me to be creative without all the pressures and demands I had set for myself with the other medium.” When I asked if there was a certain message to his work he said there wasn’t, just his way to let it be known that he is present in the world .Or as he cleverly puts it… “This is me. Here’s all the s*** that’s making noise in my head. I want it out and you seem to enjoy looking at it!”

Come view Oliver’s work at SPARKBOOM’s Artspace Unplugged event August 9th at 20 Terry Street in Patchogue from 6-10PM. There will an abundance of art to see, live acoustic music and craft beer and food courtesy of Saint James Brewery and Mia’s River Avenue Deli! RSVP here via FB!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

rain roomJenna Weis grew up on Long Island and graduated from Commack High School in 2007. She received her Associates Degree in Visual Arts from Suffolk Community College then went on to receive her Bachelor’s Degree in Art History and Criticism from Stony Brook University. This is her second summer working for SPARKBOOMTM, first as Lead Blogger. She hopes the blog will really engage readers to want to see more of the artists work at our SPARKBOOMTM events and help further promote the artists themselves.

 

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Steve Ceraso – Transforming Basic Materials

By Jenna Weis

steve cersaso

In the art world, to utilize the most expensive and sophisticated tools from a local art store does not necessarily produce work with character. This is something achieved by being innovative with what is already available paired with the technical knowledge of the medium. Sculptor Steve Ceraso has mastered multiple types of three dimensional art techniques creating various series of works, each diverse in content yet all formed from re-purposed materials. Although his venture as an artist began with mechanical drawing and architecture in high school, it was the act of sculpture making that fulfilled his creativity…

“I wanted to make art that went beyond image-making. Sculpture and installation did that for me.”

Without the guidance of a specific image Ceraso must rely on his own creativity and the objects themselves to construct sculptures that truly emit character in the sense of materiality and form.

As Ceraso evolves as an artist, so does his work. He explains; “From series to series, I am thinking about changes, however these re-purposed materials are always there. I want the viewer to respond to my work and make conclusions of their own.” His Amorphous Form series came together when working with a group of sculptors in Long Island City and learned the art of cast iron sculpture.

The “biomorphic shapes” as he describes, completely reconfigures the rigid material of the metal that it once was. He explains; “I was concerned with making these fluid organic forms because it is something that is difficult to achieve with fabricated welding processes. It’s not easy to bend metal without extreme heat!” This correspondence between the original object and the end result is what Ceraso keeps in mind when obtaining his materials for a piece. Anything that makes the viewer question its original source is what inspires Ceraso.

This artist seems to always be broadening his expertise in casting. Being invited to work with other sculptors in a Pennsylvania foundry has given him the background to bronze casting. He says:

“Something about the process is just amazing, the process of working in a foundry with other sculptors is also a great exchange of ideas and skills.”

Taking his knowledge of casting from this experience, he became a sculpture professor at LIU post working with aluminum yet still continues to be exposed to new techniques. More recently Ceraso has explored small scale pewter casting that he now teaches at a Bay Shore gallery that he manages.

Steve Ceraso will be showcasing his work at SPARKBOOM‘s 2014 kickoff event June 21st at The Walt Whitman Birthplace from 7-10 PM. Look for him in the Sculpture Garden! RSVP here. For more information visit: sparkboom.org.

For more about Steve Ceraso visit: stevenceraso.com.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

rain roomJenna Weis grew up on Long Island and graduated from Commack High School in 2007. She received her Associates Degree in Visual Arts from Suffolk Community College then went on to receive her Bachelor’s Degree in Art History and Criticism from Stony Brook University. This is her second summer working for SPARKBOOMTM, first as Lead Blogger. She hopes the blog will really engage readers to want to see more of the artists work at our SPARKBOOMTM events and help further promote the artists themselves.

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Nancy Wong – Art and Life Through Motion

Working on _Embraced in his October peace_

By Jenna Weis

Experiences, dreams, and imaginations we all encounter through the journey of life, in every aspect of life, create a constant motion that multimedia artist Nancy Wong thrives in with her art work. As a self taught artist she uses the everyday as her resource for inspiration. Using found materials such as cardboard for a canvas and a variety of different drawing tools over what would be deemed traditional, Wong’s art truly sets her apart. The animated quality and symbolic undertones together leave_Each of us shares a mark here II_s the viewer engaged as well as curious. She states “A range of my work from oil paintings, ceramics, sculpture, printmaking, or mixed media derives from ideas set from every day experiences or where our dreams and imagination may take us.”

This idea of motion, in regards to life experiences, prevails throughout Wong’s art in every medium she sets before her. Her two dimensional pieces have a constant flow that is made visible in the way she handles the brush, sharpie, or pen. Swirls are a reoccurring decorative element that she explains “Drawing swirls is a relaxing, stress free technique requiring constant movement, concentration, and staying meticulous to the lines established.”

From a personal evolutionary sense Wong recalls her summer of 2003 when she was constantly oContinuous scalesn the go between work, friends, family and other activities. This experience gave Wong the foundation for her porcelain koi fish piece which visually displays her progression in to the artist she is today. Wong describes this piece as “the process of ten years becoming an individual inspired by different experiences. Although each fish is different in style and length, it functions together as a whole piece.” Fish, as a representation of good luck in the Chinese culture here represent how her movement through past and present experiences together helps shape the artist.

RodrigoWith a reliance on herself and her morals Wong’s work radiates this confidence and depth beyond the beautiful aesthetics on the surface. She makes a statement that I feel everyone should live by no matter what we do or who we are…

“I believe it’s important to have a good work ethic, be genuine, and use your whole heart to create something if it is meaningful to you.”

 

Come experience Nancy Wong’s work at SPARKBOOM’S kickoff event “Beards, Bards and BOOM” on Saturday, June 21st from 7-10 PM at the Walt Whitman Birthplace. RSVP here. For more information visit: sparkboom.org.

To see more of Nancy’s art visit: nancywong.tk.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

rain roomJenna Weis grew up on Long Island and graduated from Commack High School in 2007. She received her Associates Degree in Visual Arts from Suffolk Community College then went on to receive her Bachelor’s Degree in Art History and Criticism from Stony Brook University. This is her second summer working for SPARKBOOMTM, first as Lead Blogger. She hopes the blog will really engage readers to want to see more of the artists work at our SPARKBOOMTM events and help further promote the artists themselves.

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